Entries tagged with “Adventure”.


Win a signed copy of Renegade! Details at the end of this post.

Renegade

Chapter One

 Sacrifices must be made for the greater good.

—Citizen’s Social Code, Volume VI

My life is just about perfect.

Every morning Mother has the Maids wake me at precisely ten. Then it’s time for a light breakfast followed by a mandatory visit with my Therapist. It’s nice to have someone to talk with.

After, I am free to do as I wish until it’s time to perform one of the duties Mother has requested of me. This morning I sit in my garden, quietly doing my cross-stitching. the garden is so peaceful in the morning, especially when the sea life outside the glass dome passes by.

The Surface could never compare. Not that I’ve ever seen the Surface. It is forbidden, even for me.

Which is fine. My life is just about perfect.

Excerpt copyright © 2012 J.A. Souders


About the book:

“MY LIFE IS JUST ABOUT PERFECT.”

Since the age of three, sixteen-year-old Evelyn Winters has been trained to be Daughter of the People in the underwater utopia known as Elysium. Selected from hundreds of children for her ideal genes, all her life she’s thought that everything was perfect; her world. Her people. The Law.

But when Gavin Hunter, a Surface Dweller, accidentally stumbles into their secluded little world, she’s forced to come to a startling realization: everything she knows is a lie. Her memories have been altered. Her mind and body aren’t under her own control. And the person she knows as Mother is a monster.

Together with Gavin she plans her escape, only to learn that her own mind is a ticking time bomb… and Mother has one last secret that will destroy them all.

What people are saying:

“Grim, vicious, riveting. Renegade is a haunting, unforgettable debut.”–Ann Aguirre, USA Today bestselling author of ENCLAVE and OUTPOST

“RENEGADE is a dark tale of deceit, with twists that will keep you turning the pages, and an ending that will have you on the edge of your seat.”–Lisa Desrochers, author of PERSONAL DEMONS

“Deliciously creepy and filled with psychological twists, Renegade kept me on the edge of my seat until the very last page.”—Kristen Simmons, author of ARTICLE 5

Released: November 13, 2012

About the author:

J.A. Souders was born in the heartland with an overactive imagination and an over abundance of curiosity that was always getting her into trouble. She first began writing at the age of 13, when she moved to Florida and not only befriended the monsters under the bed, but created worlds for them to play together.

Because she never grew up, she decided she’d put her imaginary friends to work and started writing. She still lives in the land of sunshine and palm trees with her husband and their two children. Visit her at www.jasouders.com.

Giveaway:

Jessica has been kind enough to contribute a signed copy of Renegade for a giveaway!

The contest is open in the US and Canada, and ends on January 9th at midnight EST.

Just comment on this post to enter.

For extra entries:

-Be a follower on Twitter or like us on Facebook [+1 entry each].

-Link to this contest on Twitter, Facebook, etc. [+1 entry per each link].

Please list your extra entries in the comments.

Good luck and happy reading!

 


There are four Captain Stupendous fan clubs in Copperplate City, but ours is the only one that doesn’t suck. There’s the Official Captain Stupendous Fan Club (they hold a trademark on the name, including “Official”), the Friends of Stupendous (a group of rich old ladies, if you can believe it), the Stupendites (a bunch of girls who probably spend all their time trying on each other’s clothes), and us. We’re the Captain Stupendous Fan Club, period. We’re the real deal, even if we are the smallest fan club in the city. Maybe in the country. Possibly on the entire planet.

So when a giant robot came to town and picked a fight right outside Spud’s Pizza, you can guess how psyched I was. Everyone who’s ever lived in Copperplate City has seen at least one Stupendous battle in person, but it never gets old. And Spud’s is in my neighborhood!

Excerpt copyright © 2012 Mike Jung


About the book:

Three 12 year old boys, Vincent, George, and Max, discover that Captain Stupendous, their hometown superhero, has forgotten how to be a superhero, and they must help him remember in time to defeat a new supervillain who’s come to town while figuring out how Vincent’s crush, Polly Winnicott-Lee, is involved.

What people are saying:

“GEEKS, GIRLS, AND SECRET IDENTITIES by Mike Jung is a joyful, action-packed ode to comic books, friendship, and the many faces of heroism. Spandex and super-villains have never been this funny. Captain Stupendous — and Mike Jung — have themselves a new fan.”–Jenn Reese, ABOVE WORLD

“Fast-paced, suspenseful and downright hilarious. Mike Jung gets the details of the comics world exactly right. Readers will love the surprising twists and turns.”–H.N. Kowitt, THE LOSER LIST

“A snappy, hilarious adventure set in a world I would love to live in. Clever, fun, and full of surprises – it’s the perfect book for the reluctant reader in your life.”–Michael Buckley, N.E.R.D.S.

“If Stan Lee had written Freaks and Geeks it would look like this!…Jung’s novel is a hilarious twist on the classic superhero story! Giant robots, hidden lairs, middle-school crushes and uber-fanboys combine to make one stupendous debut!”–Matthew Cody, POWERLESS

“Fresh, page-turny, honest and most of all funny–Mike Jung’s voice is such a welcome addition and this book is a glorious treasure-mix of realness and wonderment.”–Aimee Bender, THE PARTICULAR SADNESS OF LEMON CAKE

“Wow! Superheroes, Supervillains, geeks on bikes, a stinky swamp, real friends, deep, dark secrets, shattering windows, BIG decisions…and everything else that matters!”–Kathleen Duey, SKIN HUNGER

Released: October 1, 2012

About the author:

Mike Jung is an active blogger, parent, SCBWI member, and library professional. He lives in Oakland, California, with his wife and two young children. This is his first novel. You can visit him at http://captainstupendous.wordpress.com.


Win a copy of The Universe of Fair! Details at the end of this post.

Chapter 1

The Force Field

On the way home from school on the bus I’m staring off into space and thinking about how weird it is that I ended up to be me, Miller Sanford, from Holmsbury, Connecticut. I think how much more likely it is that I would have been born in China, because there are more than a billion people there and only three hundred million here, and even less in Connecticut, and way less in Holmsbury.

Then I think that if I was born in China, I’d probably be allowed to ride my bicycle home from middle school. Unless I had the same mom in China that I have now. Which I guess I’d want, even if she wouldn’t let me ride my bicycle home from school. Which she wouldn’t.

What’s even weirder to think about is that if my molecules and atoms and electrons and quarks were put together in a different way, I could just as easily be an earthworm. Or a rock. Maybe I am a rock. Maybe I’m a rock that just thinks I’m an eleven-and-a-half-year-old boy.

“How do you know you’re not really a rock?” I ask my friend Lewis, who’s in the seat behind me.

“Because rocks don’t make movies,” Lewis says. He waves his hand sideways, keeping his eyes glued to the flip screen of his video camera. “Stand up and look out the window.”

Excerpt copyright © 2012 Leslie Bulion


About the book:

For young science whiz Miller Sanford, an eagerly awaited day at the fair turns into a wacky adventure with more twists and loops than the BlastoCoaster! Instead of enjoying a freewheeling day on his own, he’s drawn into a series of mishaps involving a string of tagalong first graders, his dad’s prize-worthy lemon meringue pie, and flying death heads!

What people are saying:

“…this winsome effort not only lovingly celebrates the color and magic of the fair, but endearingly depicts the inner landscape of a maturing child encountering his first taste of the adult world. A cheerful and totally entertaining look at fairs, friendship and the value of family.”–Kirkus Reviews

“…Bulion captures the boisterous, chaotic nature of the fair, as well as its primacy in the grade-school social calendar. Dormer’s characteristically sketchy and childlike illustrations match the upbeat mood of this entertaining story.”–Publishers Weekly

About the author:

Leslie Bulion has graduate degrees in oceanography and social work. She has written parenting and education articles and is the author of several children’s books, including Uncharted Waters, The Trouble with Rules, and At the Sea Floor Café. Leslie lives in Connecticut with her husband, Rubin Hirsch, and at the youth exhibit of her town’s agricultural fair. Visit her at www.lesliebulion.com.

About the illustrator:

Frank W. Dormer, a graduate of the Savannah College of Art and Design, is an elementary school art teacher. In addition to illustrating many children’s books, he wrote and illustrated The Obstinate Pen and Socksquatch. He has drawn dogs, kids, cowboys, pens, imaginary creatures, and now thanks to Leslie Bulion, bumper cars. Rank lives in Branford, Connecticut. Visit him at www.frankwdormer.com.

Giveaway:

The publisher has been kind enough to contribute a copy of The Universe of Fair for a giveaway!

The contest is open in the US and Canada, and ends on October 31st at midnight EST.

Just comment on this post to enter.

For extra entries:

-Be a follower on Twitter or like us on Facebook [+1 entry each].

-Link to this contest on Twitter, Facebook, etc. [+1 entry per each link].

Please list your extra entries in the comments.

Good luck and happy reading!


Win a signed ARC of The Rock of Ivanore! Details at the end of this post.

The old enchanter rose from his cot, his joints creaking like rusty hinges. His sleep had been troubled, and thoughts of the days ahead worried him. Taking care not to wake his apprentice, Zyll went to the table in the center of the room, though his legs were so stiff that even traveling the width of his cottage required the use of a walking stick. With his free hand, he took a copper bowl down from a shelf and set it on the table. He grinned at the fresh bucket of water on the hearth, grateful that the boy had remembered to fill it this time.

Zyll ladled water into the bowl and peered at his reflection in it. How changed he looked, how unlike the man he used to be. His hair, once thick and dark, had thinned and grown white, and the skin around his mouth had creased, but his eyes still glowed with the vibrancy of youth. One thing, at least, had remained the same.

Excerpt copyright © 2012 Laurisa White Reyes


About the book:

The annual Great Quest is about to be announced in Quendel, a task that will determine the future of Marcus and the other boys from the village who are coming of age. The wizard Zyll commands them to find the Rock of Ivanore, but he doesn’t tell them what the Rock is exactly or where it can be found. Marcus must reach deep within himself to develop new powers of magic and find the strength to survive the wild lands and fierce enemies he encounters as he searches for the illusive Rock. If he succeeds, he will live a life of honor; if he fails, he will live a life of menial labor in shame. With more twists and turns than a labyrinth, and a story in which nothing is as it seems, this tale of deception and discovery keeps readers in suspense until the end.

What people are saying:

“Young readers…will delight in this opening title in The Celestine Chronicles series, which delivers a fantasy adventure for a reluctant readership.”–Booklist

“Marcus is a hero who engages challenges in a way that is both human and admirable.”–Publisher’s Weekly

“This is a swift and compelling epic that readers of high fantasy will love!”–Tony Abbott, author of The Secrets of Droon

“Magic! Swords! Mysterious cloaked figures! A good choice for middle-grade fantasy lovers.”–Marissa Burt, author of Storybound

Released: May 15, 2012

About the author:

Laurisa White Reyes has been writing since the age of 5 when she wrote her first poem on a scrap of poster board. After earning a degree in English at California State University at Northridge, she spent thirteen years writing for various magazines and newspapers, working as a book editor, and teaching creative writing. She gave up all that six years ago to follow her lifelong dream of writing novels. Her first book, The Rock of Ivanore, will be released in May 2012.

Besides writing, Laurisa is also a voracious reader. She also loves musical theater, chocolate, sushi, ancient history, bearded dragons, and rain storms. She lives in Southern California with her husband, 5 children, 4 birds, 2 lizards, 2 turtles, 1 fish, 1 dog, and a partridge in a pear tree. Visit her at www.laurisawhitereyes.com.

Giveaway:

Laurisa has been kind enough to contribute a signed ARC of The Rock of Ivanore for a giveaway!

Just comment on this post to enter.

For extra entries:

-Be a follower on Twitter [+1 entry].

-Link to this contest on Twitter, Facebook, etc. [+1 entry per each link].

Please list your extra entries in the comments.

The contest is open in the US and Canada, and ends on July 11th at midnight EST.

Good luck and happy reading!


Win a signed copy of Tracing Stars! Details at the end of this post.

I drop low in the seat and look out the bus window. We pass Pa’s shop, Chickory and Chips Famous Fishery. I wave to the wooden pirate, Barnacle Briggs, who is always out front holding the shop sign. We zip on past and turn right onto Blue Jay Crossing. I hold my backpack on my lap. It shifts back and forth as the bus jostles over the bumpy road.

It’s the last day of school. The last day of fifth grade and I’m dying for it to be over. I make a fish face in the window as we pass the harbor where Pa’s boat, the Mary Grace, usually sits. The spot is empty ’cause he’s already out making his rounds. Pa is the best fisherman in all of Plumtown and brings in the most lobsters. But that’s not all. He dredges for mussels and also catches hake, fluke, flounder, monkfish, whiting, ocean perch, pollack, and sometimes wolffish. Wolffish is the ugliest fish I’ve ever seen, but it tastes all right if you ask me. I make the face of a wolffish in the window, pulling my mouth down into a big line from one side of my chin to the other. I pop my eyes way out and pull my eyebrows down into the middle the best I can and I think it’s a pretty great wolffish grin. Real menacing and gross.

“Indie.” I look away from my reflection and over to my older sister, Bebe, in the seat across from me. “Stop it,” she says out of the corner of her mouth. She doesn’t like it when I make fish faces anymore, even though she used to love it. Now she’s too old and mature for that sort of thing, and whenever I do it, she pretty much pretends she doesn’t know me.

I throw on a trout pout because that’s the one she used to giggle at the most, but this time she groans and looks out her window.

My backpack almost slides off my lap and I grab at it. Then the bus squeals to a stop and a whole bunch of kids get on at The Manors. That’s the cul-de-sac where all the rich people live. Mom says you don’t move to Plumtown unless you’re rich or you’re a hard worker. That’s the way it goes. We’re in the hard-worker part. I make sure to scrunch way over in case any of the fancy kids want to have a seat, but as usual, I can spread out, ’cause three kids all cram into the seat in front of me and one sits down right next to Bebe and they start talking like they’re best pals.

Excerpt copyright © 2012 Erin E. Moulton


About the book:

Tracing Stars is a summer tale that centers on Indie Lee Chickory and Owen Stone, their quest for a golden lobster (They’re real! one in every thirty million), and acceptance.

What people are saying:

“This improbable plot and spunky protagonist are appealing bait for a heartfelt, memorable story.”–Kirkus

“This timeless story perfectly captures the growth that summer affords kids when, after endless days and nights, they emerge truer versions of themselves.”–Booklist

“Moulton’s sensitivity to her characters’ emotions extends the tale’s mood and setting.”–Horn Book

“Set in a Maine coastal town, this offbeat summer story ably explores themes of self-discovery and friendship.”–School Library Journal

Released: May 12, 2012

About the author:

Erin E. Moulton graduated with an MFA in Writing from the Vermont College of Fine Arts.  She is the author of Flutter(Philomel/Penguin 2011) and Tracing Stars(Philomel/Penguing 2012).  Erin is Co-Founder of the Kinship Writers Association and is currently the YA librarian at the Derry Public Library.  She lives in Southern NH with her husband and puppies where she write, reads, drinks tea and dreams.  You can visit her online at www.erinemoulton.com, or on facebook as Erin E. Moulton (Author), or follow her on twitter @erinemoulton

Giveaway:

Erin has been kind enough to contribute a signed copy of Tracing Stars for a giveaway!

Just comment on this post to enter.

For extra entries:

-Be a follower on Twitter [+1 entry].

-Link to this contest on Twitter, Facebook, etc. [+1 entry per each link].

Please list your extra entries in the comments.

The contest is open in the US and Canada, and ends on July 4th at midnight EST.

Good luck and happy reading!


Win a copy of Tokyo Heist! Details at the end of this post.

Chapter 1

The wind, the rain, my soaked Converse sneakers: I blame it all on my dad. It’s his fault I waited in front of Jet City Comics for over an hour before hopping a bus to Seattle’s Pioneer Square. Now I’m slogging downtown through a rainstorm, dragging my suitcase through puddles.

Most of the art galleries are already closed for the day, but the Margo Wise Gallery glows with cool light. I duck under the awning and wipe my steamed-up glasses. Through the gallery window, I scan the crowd. Well-dressed men and women gather around paintings, eating off tiny plates, but I don’t see anybody whom I know. A jazz trio plays in a corner. Everyone will stare when I go in. I don’t look like an artist’s daughter. I look like a runaway trying to score food.

But I was invited! I take the damp, creased postcard from the pocket of my leather jacket. GLENN MARKLUND, MADRONA GROVE: PAINTINGS FROM ORCAS ISLAND. ARTIST RECEPTION THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 6:00-8:00 PM. My name, Violet Rossi, appears on a label above my mom’s address. The other side shows one of my dad’s paintings: a lone madrona tree on a bluff, its bark a collage of mottled browns, its leaves dark green and waxy. Its trunk sways to the left, like a woman sticking out her hip. The tree radiates chikara, my favorite Japanese word. It means “confidence” or “power.”

I could use some chikara right now.

Excerpt copyright © 2012 Diana Renn


 About the book:

When sixteen-year-old Violet agrees to spend the summer with her father, an up-and-coming artist in Seattle, she has no idea what she’s walking into. Her father’s newest clients, the Yamada family, are the victims of a high-profile art robbery: van Gogh sketches have been stolen from their home, and, until they can produce the corresponding painting, everyone’s lives are in danger — including Violet’s and her father’s.

Violet’s search for the missing van Gogh takes her from the Seattle Art Museum, to the yakuza-infested streets of Tokyo, to a secluded inn in Kyoto. As the mystery thickens, Violet’s not sure whom she can trust. But she knows one thing: she has to solve the mystery — before it’s too late.

 What people are saying:

“Renn’s fun debut takes a kitchen-sink approach, throwing together romance, mystery, and action in a way that echoes the manga that 16-year-old Violet loves to read . . . . Fans of mysteries and thrillers will enjoy this just as much as fans of Japanese culture.”–Publisher’s Weekly

“A proficient caper spiced up by Violet’s eye for art.”–Kirkus Reviews

“Renn’s debut will be a surefire hit with Japanophiles, who will thoroughly appreciate Violet’s enthusiasm for the culture.”–Booklist

“The plot has lots of twist and turns, leaving readers on edge . . . . Readers will cheer for Violet as she uses her wits and outsmarts the adults.”–School Library Journal

“Renn keeps the tension high and the pace moving in a modern, unique whodunit . . . . Tokyo Heist is a refreshing break from the tsunami of dystopian, paranormal titles in the young adult aisle.”–Susan Carpenter, The Los Angeles Times

Released: June 14, 2012

About the author:

Diana Renn writes contemporary mysteries for young adults. She also writes short fiction and essays, which have been published in a variety of magazines. A Seattle native, she now lives outside of Boston with her husband and son. Tokyo Heist is her first novel. Visit her online atwww.dianarennbooks.com.

Giveaway:

Diana has been kind enough to contribute a copy of Tokyo Heist for a giveaway!

Just comment on this post to enter.

For extra entries:

-Be a follower on Twitter [+1 entry].

-Link to this contest on Twitter, Facebook, etc. [+1 entry per each link].

Please list your extra entries in the comments.

The contest is open in the US and Canada, and ends on June 27th at midnight EST.

Good luck and happy reading!


Win a copy of Real Mermaids Don’t Hold Their Breath! Details below.

The month leading up to my fourteenth birthday was the most exciting time of my life.

1. I found out my mom hadn’t drowned but was actually a mermaid.

2. I discovered I was part mermaid too.

3. I rescued my mom from a bunch of mer-freaks inTalismanLakeand freed her into the ocean so she could have a chance to become human again.

4. I had my first kiss.

5. Did I mention my first kiss?

The month since my fourteenth birthday, however? Not so exciting.

My mom was still floating around in the ocean some­where, and I had no idea if she’d ever make it back home. Plus, it was getting harder and harder to keep my mer-secret from my best friend Cori and I hadn’t seen my crush Luke since he left for camp weeks earlier, so I was beginning to feel like I’d dreamt the whole first kiss thing up.

All in all, the month of July was beginning to feel like an Ice Age and a half—especially since I’d spent most of it scooping up ten trillion cones full of ice cream for every man, woman, and child in my small oceanside town of Port Toulouse.

I poked my head out from under the awning of Bridget’s Ice Cream Parlor and glanced up and downMain Street, silently begging for Cori to come in early for her shift to save me from my suffering.

(READ the whole 1st chapter: HERE)

Excerpt copyright © 2012 Hélène Boudreau


About the book:

Normal is never coming back…

Jade is totally confused. As in, “will this be a leg-day or a tail-day?” kind of confused. Even worse, it’s been forever since her first kiss with Luke and now—nothing. Not even a text message.

Sigh.

But Jade doesn’t have time to figure out the weirdness of boys and how to use her shiny new tail. (Seriously, being a mermaid should come with a handbook.) She has to come up with a plan to get her missing mermaid mom back on dry land.

The only problem is…Jade is afraid of the ocean. But even aqua-phobic mer-girls have to take the plunge sometime…

What people are saying:

“Bravo to Hélène Boudreau for hitting the bull’s-eye with a fresh, affectionate, watery twist on the classic coming-of-age-story.”—New York Journal of Books

“The author keeps suspense high…while tapping straight into young teens’ angst about friends, enemies, and boys.”—Kirkus

Released: May 1, 2012

About the author:

Hélène Boudreau grew up on an island surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean but now writes fiction and non-fiction for kids from her land-locked home in Ontario,Canada.

She has never time-travelled or saved an endangered bird, nor has she ever spotted a mermaid in the wild, but she believes mermaids are just as plausible as sea horses, flying fish, or electric eels.

Her tween novel, Real Mermaids Don’t Wear Toe Rings is a 2011 Crystal Kite Member Choice Award Finalist. Visit her at www.heleneboudreau.com.

Giveaway:

Hélène has been kind enough to contribute a signed copy of Real Mermaids Don’t Hold Their Breath for a giveaway!

Just comment on this post to enter.

For extra entries:

-Be a follower on Twitter [+1 entry].

-Link to this contest on Twitter, Facebook, etc. [+1 entry per each link].

Please list your extra entries in the comments.

The contest is open in the US only, and ends on June 13th at midnight EST.

Good luck and happy reading!


Goldenrod Moram had a first name that sounded like it belonged in the middle of a fairy tale, where she would be the dazzling princess in need of rescuing. But this couldn’t be further from the truth. For one thing, fairy-tale princesses probably didn’t get in trouble practically every day of the fifth grade. (Then again, they probably didn’t talk back much either.) For another, fairy-tale princesses probably had more than one friend in the whole entire world. (And, if they didn’t, they at least had servants or courtiers or some such other fan base that could pass for friends.)

But Goldenrod had only been named Goldenrod because her mother was an avid gardener and her father had lost the coin toss on the day of her birth. Had her father won, she might have been named after one of his hobbies, which included cooking and amateur house repair. When daydreaming, Goldenrod often thought about all the other things she could have been called and how they all would have been preferable: Oregano Moram, Staple Gun Moram, Brisket Moram, Spark Plug…

“Goldenrod!”

Nope, she couldn’t escape her name. And here it was being hissed at her by a tall woman with dark hair and pursed lips.

Copyright © 2012 Sarvenaz Tash


About the book:

Goldenrod Moram loves nothing better than a good quest. Intrepid, curious, and full of a well-honed sense of adventure, she decides to start her own exploring team fashioned after her idols, the explorers Lewis and Clark, and to map the forest right behind her home. This task is complicated, however, by a series of unique events—a chance encounter with a mysterious old lady has her searching for a legendary blue rose. Another encounter lands her in the middle of a ragtag gang of brilliant troublemakers. And when she stumbles upon none other than the ghost of Meriwether Lewis himself, Goldenrod knows this will be anything but an ordinary summer . . . or an ordinary quest.

What people are saying:

“Full of adventure and mystery, this novel is sure to bring out the explorer in every reader…RECOMMENDED.”–Library Media Connection

The Mapmaker and the Ghost is a book that readers of all ages will gobble up like cupcakes. A definite must read!”–Word Spelunking

Released: April 24, 2012

About the author:

Sarvenaz Tash was born in Tehran, Iran and grew up on Long Island, NY. She received her BFA in Film and Television from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. This means she got to spend most of college running around and making movies (it was a lot of fun). She has dabbled in all sorts of writing including screenwriting, copywriting, and professional tweeting. Sarvenaz currently lives in Brooklyn, NY. The Mapmaker and the Ghost is her debut novel. Visit her at www.sarvenaztash.com.


Win a signed copy of Storybound! Details at the end of this post.

Una often told herself that she was invisible. Perhaps that was the reason people passed her in the halls, their eyes skimming over her slight form as if she were part of the scenery: a desk, a book, a classroom, a girl. It could also be the reason why Ms. McDonough, perched on her musty old pink chair, talked to her cats about Una as though Una wasn’t there. “The girl sassed me today,” she would say, or “The girl is quite selfish and irresponsible.” But Una didn’t mind too much. The cats couldn’t tease Una like the kids in the other foster homes had. There had been five foster families so far, and Ms. McDonough’s was the first, where Una could actually be alone. Even at dinner, as they sat together at the long mahogany table, the surface polished to such a gleam that Una’s big violet eyes looked back up at her, even there Ms. McDonough never acknowledged her, and Una was left to her own imagination.

Copyright © 2012 Marissa Burt

***Read Storybound for FREE in April on the HarperCollins website.***


About the book:

When Una Fairchild stumbles upon a mysterious book buried deep in the basement of her school library, she finds herself Written In to the land of Story—a world filled with Heroes and Villains and fairy-tale characters.

Together with her new friend Peter and a talking cat named Sam, Una digs deep into Story’s shadowy past to find out why she has been Written In. She quickly realizes that she is tied to the world in ways she never could have imagined—and it might be up to her to save it.

What people are saying:

“An appealing fantasy.  Strong writing and interesting characters make Una’s journey enjoyable, and the overall result will have readers on the lookout for the planned sequel.”–Publishers Weekly

“A richly imagined world.  Readers will enjoy the mind-bending fun of puzzling together the small details.”–Booklist

“Readers who love fantasy may see an opportunity to snuggle up with a cup of cocoa and unravel the plot, which twists and turns in on itself, with happy surprises.”–Kirkus

Released: April 3, 2012

About the author:

Marissa Burt was forever getting notes sent home from teachers about reading novels during class. She grew up in Oregon, and drifted eastward through Colorado, Illinois, Tennessee, and South Carolina before coming back to the Pacific Northwest. She now lives in the Seattle area with her husband, three sons, and heaps of books. Visit her at www.marissaburt.com.

 Giveaway:

Marissa has been kind enough to contribute a signed copy of Storybound for a giveaway!

Just comment on this post to enter.

For extra entries:

-Be a follower on Twitter [+1 entry].

-Link to this contest on Twitter, Facebook, etc. [+1 entry per each link].

Please list your extra entries in the comments.

The contest is open in the US and Canada, and ends on April 25th at midnight EST.

Good luck and happy reading!


Win an ARC of Wonder Show! Details at the end of this post.


Wayward can mean a lot of things. It can mean lost, misled, unfortunate, left behind. That is how the girls at The Home thought of themselves, despite their best efforts to live some other way.

For the inhabitants of Brewster Falls, wayward meant wicked. Dangerous. Trash. And that is how they treated the girls on the rare occasions they showed their faces in town.

Portia was the only one who went on a regular basis — she did the shopping and stopped at the post office for letters and telegrams. She rode the red bicycle and did not cover her long dark hair, and sang old gypsy songs at the top of her lungs, and she seemed (to the residents of Brewster Falls) like a banshee coming to steal their souls. Mothers would hide their children indoors when Portia came whipping down the road.

They were a fearful group of folks.

Portia loved to torment them. And she loved the red bicycle.

Riding a bicycle was the only kind of freedom for Portia. It was something she thought she’d always known how to do, simply because she couldn’t remember learning, couldn’t place the first time she’d done it. Like laughing. Or eating an apple. It was so utterly normal that it didn’t even require thought.

Excerpt copyright © 2012 Hannah Barnaby


About the book:

Wonder Show is the adventure of a young girl named Portia, desperate to escape a home for wayward girls — so desperate that she flees by bicycle to join up with a traveling carnival sideshow. But Portia soon finds that a freak show isn’t an easy place to hide, especially not for a “normal.”

What people are saying:

“I felt a cautious thrill after reading the opening of Wonder Show, that it might be what it hinted at: a discovery, a rare bird: a Book You Want To Tell Everyone About. And glory: IT IS. So, Hello Everyone. Read Wonder Show. Pass it on.”–Laini Taylor, National Book Award Finalist for Lips Touch Three Times

“Portia, the young heroine of this lovely novel, is described by her aunt as having a ‘generous heart and a wild imagination.’ The same could be said of the author, and the entire book. I loved it.”–Daniel Wallace, author of Big Fish

“I love this book! Wonder Show is just that — a shadowy world of wonders and marvels, galore. In the flickering fairground light one senses the shades of Edward Gorey and Chas Addams, standing amidst the rubes, listening to the ballyhoo with quarters in hand! Oh, it is all as darkly delicious as Devil’s food cake.”–Tim Wynne-Jones, winner of the 2011 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Blink & Caution

Released: March 20, 2012

About the author:

Hannah Barnaby has worked as a children’s book editor, a bookseller at independent children’s bookstores, and a teacher of writing for children and young adults. She holds an MA in Children’s Literature from Simmons College and an MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults from Vermont College. She began writing Wonder Show, her first novel, during her time as the first Children’s Writer-in-Residence at the Boston Public Library. Ms. Barnaby lives in Connecticut with her family. You can visit her at www.hannahbarnaby.com.

Giveaway:

Hannah has been kind enough to contribute an ARC of Wonder Show for a giveaway!

Just comment on this post to enter.

For extra entries:

-Be a follower on Twitter [+1 entry].

-Link to this contest on Twitter, Facebook, etc. [+1 entry per each link].

Please list your extra entries in the comments.

The contest is open in the US and Canada, and ends on April 4th at midnight EST.

Good luck and happy reading!